Hinging my head around bike storage

Ever since I moved out, I’ve been keeping my two-bike fleet, Hyro and Bino, inside the living room of my house. While it’s a very safe location for the fleet, it’s also eaten into some interior space, no matter how narrow they are. It’s space my wife feels could be put to better use.

The house has a pretty secure service area where I wash laundry and hang it out to air-dry. It has high walls all around, but save for a couple of alcoves, most of it has no roof. I’ve tried storing my bikes there, with rain covers in case of downpours.

This has been, quite literally, a mixed bag.

While the rain covers do protect the bikes from the rain from above, they don’t do anything for moisture coming from below that pitter-patters upward as the raindrops hit the concrete floor. On Bino, especially, this has resulted in the development of some surface rust on the chain, as the drivetrain sits much lower on a small-wheeled bike. This rust is easily removed, but my point is the rain cover route isn’t as great a storage idea as it first sounds, as the bikes are still pretty exposed to the elements this way. The rain covers have since developed rips and tears, too, rendering them useless.

After adding a few new clotheslines, the service area seemed like viable bike storage again. Initially, my wife thought of hanging the bikes on something like the Minoura Bike Tower 10 that Steve of the Hands On Bike blog uses.

Steve’s Minoura Bike Tower 10 with two of his bikes hung from its cradles. Photo from handsonbike.blogspot.com.

As nifty as this is, it’s not quite going to work for our house. As a road/cross bike, Hyro is a bit too long; when hung like this, his length will partially impede the doorway when swung open.

This display of kids’ bikes at Gran Trail Cycles in Makati has the Velo Hinge set perpendicular to the wall, like a normal wall hook.

I thought – why not hang the bikes vertically from the wall, by their wheels? That seemed to make more sense. Hyro’s length is less of a problem when applied vertically.

Then I remembered that I’ve already seen a bike hook that could help maximize wall space: Feedback Sports’ Velo Hinge.

The premise of the Velo Hinge is instead of hanging bikes vertically along a wall so that they’re permanently perpendicular, the entire hook assembly can pivot, so it’s possible to lean the hung bikes over closer to the wall and flatten their profile. Ingenious.

Surprisingly enough, it’s locally available – and it’s not too bad at PhP1,100 apiece. I got mine from Gran Trail Cycles’ new location at 830 Arnaiz Avenue in Makati.

Velo Hinge all closed up.

Velo Hinge opened; it actually takes a bit of effort to do so. You can see the wheel bumper and hook inside.

You can test the mechanism for yourself on the shop floor. Feedback Sports used very minimal packaging and left the hook and hinge mechanisms for all to see and play with. In my hands, the hook is fairly free-moving, resting on the hinged front wheel panel for stability when deployed. The hinge assembly is reassuringly solid and takes a fair bit of effort to open and close. It does feel up to the job of supporting and swinging a bike hanging from it.

Each Velo Hinge is rated to carry one bike weighing up to 22.7 kg (50 lb), and Feedback Sports says it can be reconfigured to swing in either direction. My guess is this requires changing the position of the hook itself. It’ll be interesting to see how this works out in practice, although so far it’s been well-reviewed.

As of this writing, I haven’t mounted the Velo Hinge to my wall just yet. It comes with wood screws; if you plan on mounting it on a concrete wall, you’ll need masonry screws. I’m also taking my sweet time in finalizing just where I want it affixed, and how I want its pivoting action to work for my house. Once mounted, and after a few weeks of use, I’ll revisit this.

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What componentry goes into a good-value road bike?

In my previous post I looked long and hard at the features of the road bike frame you should be checking. The frame is only one part of the equation that makes up the whole bike, though; many bike makers will pair one basic frame with many levels of component package to cater for different budgets.

What componentry should you prioritize? I’ll give my two centavos on the matter.

BRAKES

Why are brakes on the top of this list? I’m a strong believer in having brakes stronger than your accelerative ability.

Shimano’s Tiagra BR-4700 dual-pivot rim brake calipers are reportedly some of the better ones around, just let down by their stock brake pads. A swap to cartridge brake pads is easy, cheap, and improves speed retardation.

They’re also one of the very first things bike makers cheap out on when outfitting bikes. Fortunately this is a very easy fix, especially for caliper rim brakes. Many rim brake calipers are hamstrung by poor pads, so swapping them out for a quality set will improve your deceleration and speed control in more conditions for not much money.

Sometimes it’s the calipers themselves that are the weak link. Given how cheap of an upgrade these are, go ahead and spend the cash for good rim brake calipers. For a few generations now, Shimano’s Ultegra brake calipers are anecdotally widely recommended.

TRP Spyre brakes: still a hallmark of a good value disc-brake road bike, in my opinion.

For disc brakes, though, I would advise getting the best stock disc brake calipers you can get from the outset, as they’re not quite as cheap as rim brake calipers on the aftermarket. Aim for at least a SRAM Avid BB5 or a TRP Spyre; if you can work your way up to a Juin Tech R1/F1 (also sold as the Yokozuna Motoko) or a TRP HyRd, then better. Given how widely panned Promax’s Render R brakes are, I’d suggest upgrading them with something else straight away.

TIRES

The single best-value upgrade you can buy for your bike: better tires.

Like brakes, these are a relatively cheap fix but offer a huge improvement for the outlay. Go for as wide a tire as your frame can take. Trust me, 700C x 28 mm tires are great for dealing with the streets we have in Metro Manila. Even Continental’s basic Ultra Sport II tires are a great all-round option for everything bar very dusty roads.

WHEELSET

This is another easy target for cost cutting. If you’re buying a new bike with a lower-spec component package, you’re bound to end up with heavy but tough wheels with basic hubs and wheel bearings. I say keep them, man up, and deal with the extra rotating weight because they got you a cheaper bike overall – but target them as a possible future upgrade. If you have a turbo trainer, you could always reuse the rear wheel for indoor training.

Hyro’s Giant S-X2 wheelset. While solid, it is rather heavy and uses hubs with loose bearings. Worse, the hubs’ bearing seals have deteriorated over the last three years.

Keep in mind that wheelsets with loose bearing hubs will need hub replacement, at least, if the bearing races on the cups and cones become pitted from water ingress and general wear and tear.

TRANSMISSION

Take a long hard look at the bike’s gearing. It doesn’t really matter how many speeds the bike has (just make sure there are at least 8 at the back). What matters more is the spread of gearing, measured by how many teeth (T) the largest and smallest cogs have.

Once upon a time, this 12-30T cassette was Shimano’s widest-range offering on road bikes.

Wide range cassettes such as 11-28T or 11-32T are supposedly better for beginners, but I’d say they’re better for all-round riding. With such a wide spread, if you’re tired or feeling weak, you could always just click into an easier gear. I’d advise going for a narrow range 11-23T or 11-25T cassette only if all your riding is done on flats or in criterium races, or if you’re a particularly powerful rider.

Top: Shimano 105 RD-5701-SS short cage rear derailleur. Bottom: Shimano 105 RD-5700-GS medium cage rear derailleur.

Similarly, look for the longest cage rear derailleur you can find fitted to the bike. There is absolutely no downside to running a longer-caged rear derailleur on a road bike. In case you want to fit a cassette with easier gears, a rear derailleur with a longer cage means it’ll accept a wider range cassette at the outset. All you’ll need is an appropriately longer chain.

Up front, a 50/34T crank is just about the best option for most riders. Only strong racers need apply for 52/36T or 53/39T options (although such cranks make more sense on a small-wheeled bike). Hyro started with a 46/36T crank, and that was surprisingly useful for most riding.

COCKPIT

To maximize value, you’ll want aluminum in your cockpit. The material has many benefits, most noteworthy of which is that handlebars made of the stuff tend not to crack in a bad crash.

Giant paired Hyro with aluminum drop handlebars, with an anatomic bend and a rather deep 140 mm drop.

If you’re pinching pennies on your road bike while trying to improve your fit and comfort, I would prioritize the shape of the handlebars over than the material they’re made of. From the traditional deep round bend, to the compact and anatomic bends, there are many shapes of drop handlebar to suit all sorts of riders.

Upgrading to carbon can improve vibration dampening and shave some weight, but carbon handlebars and seatposts are never cheap…nor are saddles with carbon rails.

PEDALS

Most road bikes don’t come with pedals as they’re a matter of personal preference, and everybody’s got their preferred clipless system.

Despite the high-zoot Saint and Deore XT branding, none of these pedals breaks the PhP3300 mark.

This is another area where more money spent doesn’t exactly get you more. Looking at the Shimano SPD lineup, you’re paying quite a bit more cash over the basic Deore PD-M530s to get the weight savings of a pair of Deore XT PD-M8020s. So far, all my pedals have cost less than PhP3300 new.

Among brands, Shimano pedals are a good choice for longevity due to their easy maintenance; many others such as Look can’t be serviced and are essentially disposable.

 

Let me know in the comments what else you could compromise to get yourself a deal on a road bike that’s long on value.

Shopping for a road bike? Here’s a checklist

Sometime last year, I wrote about the things I would look for if I was to buy a folding bike again. This time, I’ll talk about the things you’ll probably want to look for if you were to buy a road bike, a cyclocross bike, or a gravel bike.

HOW DOES THE FRAME FIT YOU?

Most folding bikes can accommodate a large number of physiques because of the telescoping seatpost and handlepost; many advertise fitment of riders from 4’9” to 6’1” (144.5 to 185.5 cm). With road bikes, by comparison, bike fit is a lot more critical – so much so that an entire bike-fitting industry has popped up in recent years just to address the physical and kinematic relationship between rider and bike.

The geometry chart for Giant’s TCX from 2014. This is a pretty basic example; other manufacturers go into more detail with things such as head tube angle and bottom bracket drop.

It all begins with getting the right size bike for you. Most bikes bought off the shelf come in a range of sizes. These typically differ in their seat tube length (abbreviated ST) and top tube length (TT). For frames with non-horizontal or sloping top tubes, it’s the effective top tube length (ETT) you’re interested in. All of this is written on a bike’s geometry chart, with values per size of bike.

For newbies to road bikes, it’s best to swing your leg over the actual bike and check the fit yourself. With more experience, you can start looking into the reach and stack figures for the bike – the vertical and horizontal measurements relating to the bottom bracket and handlebars. Since reach and stack are measured from the same locations across all bikes, this provides an instant basis for comparison between them.

MIND THAT FRONT END

Related to bike fit is the head tube length (HT), which determines your riding position on the bike.

Long head tubes put you in a more upright position, and don’t require as much of your lower back. For this reason, they are a fixture on endurance bikes which are meant to be ridden for hours on end, and such bikes are better for those of us without sufficient flexibility.

By comparison, short head tubes give you a long and low position best for racing. This benefits aerodynamics, as reducing your frontal area decreases aerodynamic drag, making you more efficient while pedaling at sustained high speeds. The drawback is that you have to be able to sustain such a low position, not something everyone can do in comfort.

HOW WIDE OF A TIRE CAN YOU SMOOSH INTO THE FRAME?

Hyro can fit 32 mm tires with lots of room to spare – par for the course for a cyclocross bike.

These days, sticking wide tires into a road bike to improve comfort is no longer a badge of shame. The professional cycling peloton has done away with 23 mm tires and adopted 25 mm rubber for most races, with even wider options being used for particularly bumpy races such as Strade Bianche or Paris-Roubaix. If a modern road bike frame can’t fit at least 25 mm rubber, I suggest you look elsewhere.

This is where cyclocross bikes and gravel bikes have a distinct advantage. As per UCI competition rules, cyclocross bikes should run a 700C x 33 mm knobby tire, and most cross machines will come with even wider 35 mm rubber as stock. Gravel bikes have even less restriction, generally fitting at least a 40 mm tire with clearance to spare. Notable on both bikes is that they often run disc brakes, which removes restrictions on tire width.

MAKE SURE YOU CAN LIVE WITH YOUR FRAME’S BOTTOM BRACKET SHELL

Hyro has a BB86 bottom bracket shell. The bottom bracket bearings are pressed into the frame.

Bottom brackets and their many, many formats are a potential minefield that I tackled in a previous post. Each has its positives and negatives. So far, though, the good old 68 mm BSA threaded bottom bracket shell is the resurgent choice, after a decade of complaints on the various press-fit formats, and for good reason: it just works.

Mang Boy of LifeCycle setting up the bearing press for Hyro’s bottom bracket.

That’s not to say that frames made with the press-fit bottom bracket standards are all bad. My TCX has a BB86 bottom bracket shell, and so far I have had a decent enough experience with it, paired with FSA and Shimano cranksets. Anecdotally it’s the BB30 and PF30 formats that seem most problematic.

HEADSET CHOICES

The frame determines the kind of headset it uses. There are bikes that use pressed-in headset cups, while others have the cups integrated into the head tube.

The TCX has integrated headset cups machined into the head tube. Its 1-1/8″ and 1-1/4″ bearings support a fork with a tapered steerer tube.

This also influences the size of the headset bearings themselves. The most common combination of headset bearings I’ve seen in recent years is a 1-1/8” (1.125”) top bearing and a 1-1/4” (1.25”) bottom bearing – a headset to accommodate a fork with a so-called “tapered” steerer tube. Giant’s higher-tier bikes have the “OverDrive2” headset system, which makes use of a 1-1/4” (1.25”) top bearing and a 1-1/2” (1.5”) bottom bearing. This is supposedly to increase front-end stiffness and steering precision, but it also means headset bearings can be a little tougher to find once you need a replacement.

DISC BRAKES OR RIM BRAKES?

The decision between rim brakes or disc brakes is a major influence on the frame choice, as very few road bikes can support both (Orbea’s 2014 Avant series being a rare example). Disc brakes put more stress onto the non-drive side of the frame, so these areas have to be beefed up accordingly. Bodging a disc brake conversion on a rim brake bike can end in a bent fork or rear triangle, so you will usually have to choose between one or the other.

One argument for disc brakes is that they will support wider tires by default, as there is no longer a brake caliper straddling the width of the wheel and restricting it. Caliper rim brake bikes tend to max out at 28 mm or 30 mm rubber; cantilevers or mini V-brakes accommodating around 35 mm.

Hyro, my TCX, uses Post-Mount hardpoints for his brake calipers. This can still be found on some cyclocross bikes.

This Eddy Merckx Mourenx69 road bike uses Flat Mount hardpoints, where the mounting bolts go all the way through the chainstay. These days, this is the norm for disc-braked road bikes.

A final concern for disc-brake bikes is the caliper mounting system. Early disc-braked road bikes from 2014 cribbed the Post Mount system from mountain bikes, but Shimano has since successfully pushed for the adoption of Flat Mount – which is what you will see on modern bikes.

WHAT OTHER FEATURES DOES THE FRAME SUPPORT?

We’re delving into the realm of “nice to have” features here, but they can be a deal-breaker depending on the kind of riding a cyclist has in mind.

Many bikes still don’t offer eyelets for mounting of full-length fenders.

Personally, any road bike with no fender eyelets and rack mounting points is a no-go – automatically disqualifying a lot of options at the time I was shopping around for one. While Giant bestowed threaded eyelets on my TCX’s dropouts and fork, it was still missing mounting points at the seatstay bridge and chainstay bridge, so I had to bodge those up.

My folding bike Bino is an example of one without a brazed-on tab for a front derailleur. A front derailleur adapter wraps around the seat tube as a substitute.

Front derailleurs with braze-on mounting are prevalent almost due to preference, but not all road bike frames can mount them straight away as they don’t have the riveted or brazed-on mounting tab on the seat tube. Typically these bikes have round seat tubes, so making use of either an appropriate front derailleur adapter or a band-on front derailleur should solve this issue.

DID YOU NOTICE ANYTHING?

You may have noticed that I did not once touch on the groupset, wheels, tires, or personal-fit items like saddles, stems, and handlebars. While these are major considerations, they’re also easily replaced in case something problematic happens – almost all of them are wear items anyway. By contrast, the frame is the heart of the bicycle; if you replace the frame, you might as well have bought an entirely new bike.

I also spy a lot of questions being asked on forums and Facebook groups about frame sizing, bike fitting, headsets, or bottom brackets, when these are all highly frame-specific items and have to be taken into consideration when actually buying a bike in the first place. I find it’s much better to buy a bike knowing full well what its frame’s quirks are so that you fully understand what you’re getting into – especially if you intend to perform your own maintenance.